The History of Radley College 1847-1947 by A K Boyd. Oxford, Blackwell, 1948

Page 295 of 535

Boyd's History 1847-1947 - 250

Boyd's History 1847-1947 - 250

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OCR CHAPTER x11
WARDEN FIELD
1897—I9Is
§ I The Rev. T. Field — the new regime — the Council —— Common Room. § 2 Chronicle,
1897—1904. § 3 School work — Societies and entertainments —— games. §4 School life
under Field — Radley novels. § 5 The second half: the Council and masters. § 6 Chronicle,
1905—10 — A. C. M. Croome —— 1911—13. § 7 Warden Field’s work at Radley.
§I
T is not known who or how many were the candidates for the
Wardenship in 1897; whoever they were, they can hardly have been
considered serious rivals to the man who had intimated that he
would accept the position if it were offered to him. Thomas Field was
born on November 9th, 185 5. His father ran a small and unsuccessful
drapery shop in Folkestone; from reasons connected with its failure,
Thomas’s youth was brought chiefly under the influence of his mother,
who belonged to the sect of Particular Baptists. At the age of eight
he was entered at a commercial school at Faversham, and became
head of it in the following year, though the school took boys up to
the age of fifteen or sixteen. Dr. John Mitchinson, Headmaster of
King’s School, Canterbury, noticing this precocious leader of youth
in the course of an examination at Faversham, assisted him to his own
school at the age of twelve. Two years later he had become head of
King’s School, which included boys of seventeen and eighteen. The
chief qualities animating this irrepressible lad were a high integrity of
character, a boundless energy, and a facility to learn anything that
came his way, combined with a marked inability to forget anything
he had ever learnt. Faced with the necessity of deciding Whether he
should win a Scholarship in Classics or Mathematics, Field chose the
latter, and duly proceeded to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, as a
Scholar in 1875.
Before he reached Oxford the influence of Canterbury had been too
strong for his earlier attachment to the Particular Baptist creed (his
mother had died when he was sixteen); and after four years spent in the
afterglow of the Tractarian Movement as a member of the serious
community of Corpus, Field was, what he ever afterwards remained,
a devoted adherent of the Church of England, with a strong sense of
250

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CHAPTER x11
WARDEN FIELD
1897—I9Is
§ I The Rev. T. Field — the new regime — the Council —— Common Room. § 2 Chronicle,
1897—1904. § 3 School work — Societies and entertainments —— games. §4 School life
under Field — Radley novels. § 5 The second half: the Council and masters. § 6 Chronicle,
1905—10 — A. C. M. Croome —— 1911—13. § 7 Warden Field’s work at Radley.
§I
T is not known who or how many were the candidates for the
Wardenship in 1897; whoever they were, they can hardly have been
considered serious rivals to the man who had intimated that he
would accept the position if it were offered to him. Thomas Field was
born on November 9th, 185 5. His father ran a small and unsuccessful
drapery shop in Folkestone; from reasons connected with its failure,
Thomas’s youth was brought chiefly under the influence of his mother,
who belonged to the sect of Particular Baptists. At the age of eight
he was entered at a commercial school at Faversham, and became
head of it in the following year, though the school took boys up to
the age of fifteen or sixteen. Dr. John Mitchinson, Headmaster of
King’s School, Canterbury, noticing this precocious leader of youth
in the course of an examination at Faversham, assisted him to his own
school at the age of twelve. Two years later he had become head of
King’s School, which included boys of seventeen and eighteen. The
chief qualities animating this irrepressible lad were a high integrity of
character, a boundless energy, and a facility to learn anything that
came his way, combined with a marked inability to forget anything
he had ever learnt. Faced with the necessity of deciding Whether he
should win a Scholarship in Classics or Mathematics, Field chose the
latter, and duly proceeded to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, as a
Scholar in 1875.
Before he reached Oxford the influence of Canterbury had been too
strong for his earlier attachment to the Particular Baptist creed (his
mother had died when he was sixteen); and after four years spent in the
afterglow of the Tractarian Movement as a member of the serious
community of Corpus, Field was, what he ever afterwards remained,
a devoted adherent of the Church of England, with a strong sense of
250